Binge

Binge

Book - 2015
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The prominent LGBTQ YouTube social rights advocate presents a first collection of essays, written in his signature witty and uproarious style, that reveal such mishaps as a Cheesecake Factory meltdown, a fashion stand-off with the White House Secret Service and an embarrassing car crash.
Publisher: New York :, Gallery Books,, [2015]
ISBN: 9781501117695
Branch Call Number: 814 OAK
Characteristics: 307 pages

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Chapel_Hill_KatieJ Dec 23, 2016

I really didn’t know anything about Tyler Oakley, but this book showed up on my Recommended list. The tone and subjects of the stories are all over the place, but the book is an entertaining look into the life of someone who makes a living as a youtube star.

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cindyzhang1
Aug 28, 2016

Not as good as I expected it to be. Only recommended for fans of Tyler Oakley.

j
Jen24
Jun 18, 2016

I loved this book! It was funny to read, but you wouldn't find it funny if you don't like Tyler's humour. The stories were fun to read and some were a bit heartbreaking. I honestly couldn't put it down

It's such a snore! Tyler's personal life couldn't be any more boring. Even Joey's was a tad bit interesting compared to this. Joey actually had a difficult upbringing, and he learnt from them. And Joey gave me useful life hack tips after each chapter. Tyler has no adventure in his. Just dating, college, and elementary mishaps. Which practically everyone who ever existed has experienced as well.

In fact, I hate how almost all YouTuber books are about their childhoods. I very much prefer fictional novels. Such as Zoella's "Girl Online" series. (Which I haven't read yet.) But even the main character in "Girl Online" is loosely based on herself.

I could barely read Tyler's first book. I'm totally not binging on this memoir.

FindingJane Mar 20, 2016

First off, let me state that I’d never heard nor seen anything of Tyler Oakley before I read his book. I’ve never seen his videos, podcasts, read his blog or seen him on YouTube. I don’t know anything about the celebrities with whom he claims to have hob-nobbed. I can’t really care that he’d grown so blasé about his touring and so drenched with ennui that he started fantasizing about plane crashes while he was winging his way to another showing.

(Frankly, I thought that passage the whining of a spoilt child, one who complained because his water was Perrier instead of Avian. You’re tired of hanging out with boy bands and movie stars? Quit and devote your life to helping battered women.)

But I digress. Having no preconceptions about Mr. Oakley, I came to his book fresh and with an open mind—the best way to review a book, I think. I found his memoir to be refreshing. He’s a lively fellow on page; I imagine he must be a real treat to meet in person. His painfully honest revelations about a relationship with a closeted homosexual was difficult to read but also filled with joyous reminiscences, the moments that convinced him to hang on in the vain hope that matters would improve. Yes, Tyler, we’ve been there and your reading makes it just a little better. I wanted to reach out and pat him on his colorfully dyed hair and ensure him that he wasn’t alone.

That’s when I realized. I truly liked this lad. I liked reading about him, his foibles, his bromodosis (look it up) and his giddy fangirl attitudes, et al. I wanted to be his new best friend, even as I told myself that he probably has tons of best friends and he wouldn’t appreciate my wanting a GBF. His writing is engaging, amusing and lovingly affectionate. He strikes you as the kind who’d try to cheer you up by either singing you a song or tickling you until you turned red in the face with laughter.

Mr. Oakley won his way by daring, by quitting his job when it didn’t work out for him, by moving from his home when the siren call of San Francisco proved too strong, by not getting depressed when Google dumped him after a three-month wooing period. He’d be the last one to call himself a fearless fool—or maybe the first. But he is, he is.

The result is this memoir, as personable as the man himself and filled with photographs, stories and nuggets of advice. Tyler Oakley went all out with this literary platter and I was happy to sit down and cram myself silly.

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Vista05
Jul 05, 2017

I'm glad I decided to read this book. It was funny and I could totally hear Tyler saying all these things. Definitely would recommend to people but its not a book everyone would enjoy.

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cindyzhang1
Aug 28, 2016

The autobiography of Youtube star Tyler Oakley. Told in short chapters, Binge recounts his childhood as well as his rise to fame.

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nisku
Dec 05, 2015

nisku thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 99

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nisku
Dec 05, 2015

Coarse Language: It does swear a couple times.

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nisku
Dec 05, 2015

hi m8

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