The Rise

The Rise

Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery

Book - 2014
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"Sarah Lewis has assembled a rich trove of reflections not just on creativity but on the too-often ignored role that failure and surrender play in almost any ambitious undertaking. That counter-intuitive point of attack makes The Rise a welcome departure from standard accounts of artistry and innovation." --Lewis Hyde, author of The Gift

It is one of the enduring enigmas of the human experience: many of our most iconic, creative endeavors--from Nobel Prize--winning discoveries to entrepreneurial inventions and works in the arts--are not achievements but conversions, corrections after failed attempts.

The gift of failure is a riddle. Like the number zero, it will always be both a void and the start of infinite possibility. The Rise --a soulful celebration of the determination and courage of the human spirit--makes the case that many of our greatest triumphs come from understanding the importance of this mystery.

This exquisite biography of an idea is about the improbable foundations of creative human endeavor. The Rise begins with narratives about figures past and present who range from writers to entrepreneurs; Frederick Douglass, Samuel F. B. Morse, and J. K. Rowling, for example, feature alongside choreographer Paul Taylor, Nobel Prize--winning physicists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, Arctic explorer Ben Saunders, and psychology professor Angela Duckworth.

The Rise explores the inestimable value of often ignored ideas--the power of surrender for fortitude, the criticality of play for innovation, the propulsion of the near win on the road to mastery, and the importance of grit and creative practice. From an uncommonly insightful writer, The Rise is a true masterwork.
Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, c2014
ISBN: 9781451629231
Branch Call Number: 153.35 LEW
Characteristics: 259 pages

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a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

Back-turned paintings and sheeted sculptures are often how artists give their process amnesty from premature critique. They create safe havens for good reason, sometimes to preserve innovation. Innovative ideas, after all, are often so counterintuitive that they can, at first, look like failure.
We make discoveries, breakthroughs, and inventions in part because we are free enough to take risks, and fail if necessary. Private spaces are often where we extract the gains from attempts and misses.

a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

the cost of success is that it can block our ability to see when what has worked well in the past might not any longer

a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

Franklin [Leonard] was facing what he felt was the one thing worse than reading a morass of terrible scripts: another family getaway where he would face questions about his meandering path. It started when he survived a car crash that altered the course of his life. He had one thought on his mind now: You get one go around. A rigid model of success that stipulated being either a doctor or a lawyer had been ingrained in him since childhood. His mantra became, “Life is short. If I don’t enjoy it, I just have to find something else.”

a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

A paradox of innovation and mastery is that breakthroughs often occur when you start down a road, but wander off for a ways and pretend as if you have just begun.

a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

directed teaching is important, but learning that comes from play and spontaneous discovery is critical. Endurance is best sustained through periodic play.

a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

Grit is connected to how we respond to so-called failure, about whether we see it as a comment on our identity or merely as information that may help us improve.

a
andreareads
Sep 27, 2017

Inventions come from those who can view a familiar set of variables from a radical perspective and see new possibilities. Creative practice is one of the most effective teachers of the spry movement of this perspective shift.

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d
donna_james
Dec 22, 2015

Reviewed in the NYT Book
Review on Sunday, April 6, 2014

j
JudithMayanja
May 14, 2014

Almost a poetic meditation on the inner elements and experience of failing and the rise that comes from it. I found it an extremely helpful book since many in the culture hide their experience of failure making it almost a thing of shame. She dares to bring it to the light!!!

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