The Hero With A Thousand Faces

The Hero With A Thousand Faces

Book - 2008
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Since its release in 1949, The Hero with a Thousand Faces has influenced millions of readers by combining the insights of modern psychology with Joseph Campbell's revolutionary understanding of comparative mythology. In these pages, Campbell outlines the Hero's Journey, a universal motif of adventure and transformation that runs through virtually all of the world's mythic traditions. He also explores the Cosmogonic Cycle, the mythic pattern of world creation and destruction.

As part of the Joseph Campbell Foundation's Collected Works of Joseph Campbell, this third edition features expanded illustrations, a comprehensive bibliography, and more accessible sidebars.

As relevant today as when it was first published, The Hero with a Thousand Faces continues to find new audiences in fields ranging from religion and anthropology to literature and film studies. The book has also profoundly influenced creative artists--including authors, songwriters, game designers, and filmmakers--and continues to inspire all those interested in the inherent human need to tell stories.
Publisher: Novato, CA : New World Library, c2008
Edition: 3rd ed
ISBN: 9781577315933
Branch Call Number: 201.3 CAM
Characteristics: xiii, 418 p. : ill. ; 23 cm

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r
Rafaello
May 06, 2016

Just what I was looking for!

1
1aa
Nov 20, 2014

A modern classic of scholarship, without resorting to obscurity. Provides a plausible theory to comprehend myths from all traditions.

d
dpatel
Feb 11, 2012

Excellent. Unravels the real you behind the masks that you continuosly wear, consciously or unconsciously until it it is too late.

t
The_Bill
May 18, 2010

I cannot believe anyone would read this book, understand it, and rate it anything less than a 4.5 - it's absolutely fantastic.
The reader might take issue with the emphasis on psychoanalysis, since (as I understand it) that field of psychology has been discredited by now; the reader might also point out that Campbell makes a few logical leaps. A particularly knowledgeable reader might even point out that the structural similarities across global myths are more likely due to cross-cultural pollination rather than deep, latent dream-imagery residing within the human mind. But trust me, these criticisms do not affect the quality or the insight of this book one bit.
The point of the monomyth that Campbell sets out in this book is not to 'explain away' the powerful impact of myth, and his theory is not the endpoint of an examination of myth. It should not even be read as an interpretive framework for reading myths. Above all, the reader should not view the monomyth structure as a suggestion for future works - Star Wars and Harry Potter, as well as countless inferior works, all partake of Campbell's blueprint - because such a position is hopelessly reductive and won't get anyone anywhere.
Rather, the reader should appreciate this book for two reasons: as a general primer on comparative mythology that leads to some fascinating works, such as the Prose or Poetic Eddas or the Devi Mathatmyam, which are the fascinating and evocative epics of other cultures. The second and even more compelling reason to read this book is the quality of Campbell's prose itself; he really is a master. Read his work in the right spirit and you will feel an immense and delicious calm steal over you - one or two pages, if not paragraphs, are all that are required to feel deeply at peace. Campbell studied the holy books of various civilizations as well as their myths (if it is possible to separate the two - Campbell would say that both lead to the same profound lessons) and his style reflects that. Some passages are exciting, some inspiring, some restful.
READ THIS BOOK!

t
The_Bill
May 18, 2010

I cannot believe anyone would read this book, understand it, and rate it anything less than a 4.5 - it's absolutely fantastic.

The reader might take issue with the emphasis on psychoanalysis, since (as I understand it) that field of psychology has been discredited by now; the reader might also point out that Campbell makes a few logical leaps. A particularly knowledgeable reader might even point out that the structural similarities across global myths are more likely due to cross-cultural pollination rather than deep, latent dream-imagery residing within the human mind. But trust me, these criticisms do not affect the quality or the insight of this book one bit.

The point of the monomyth that Campbell sets out in this book is not to 'explain away' the powerful impact of myth, and his theory is not the endpoint of an examination of myth. It should not even be read as an interpretive framework for reading myths. Above all, the reader should not view the monomyth structure as a suggestion for future works - Star Wars and Harry Potter, as well as countless inferior works, all partake of Campbell's blueprint - because such a position is hopelessly reductive and won't get anyone anywhere.

Rather, the reader should appreciate this book for two reasons: as a general primer on comparative mythology that leads to some fascinating works, such as the Prose or Poetic Eddas or the Devi Mathatmyam, which are the fascinating and evocative epics of other cultures. The second and even more compelling reason to read this book is the quality of Campbell's prose itself; he really is a master. Read his work in the right spirit and you will feel an immense and delicious calm steal over you - one or two pages, if not paragraphs, are all that are required to feel deeply at peace. Campbell studied the holy books of various civilizations as well as their myths (if it is possible to separate the two - Campbell would say that both lead to the same profound lessons) and his style reflects that. Some passages are exciting, some inspiring, some restful.

READ THIS BOOK!

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