The Cry Of The Dove

The Cry Of The Dove

Book - 2007
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The English doctor tells Salma that she must forget her past. But how can she when it has followed her all the way from her tiny Bedouin village to this place in England "where the river meets the sea"? Salma has violated the laws of her tribe by becoming pregnant before marriage; to restore their honour, the villagers must kill her. Salma is imprisoned for her own protection, her baby torn from her arms. Years later, when it seems her persecutors have given up the chase, Salma is smuggled out of prison and finds exile in Exeter, England. But now, living by her Immigrant Survival Guide, Salma finds a prison of another kind. Trying to navigate the cultural divide between a permissive and often racist contemporary Western society and her traditional tribal Muslim upbringing, Salma perseveres and creates a new life. But the cries of her lost child will not be silenced; she is driven to return to her childhood village in a shattering journey that will change everything--and nothing.

Slipping seamlessly between the olive groves of the Levant and the rain-slicked streets of England, Cry of the Dove is a searing novel of forbidden love, violated honour and a woman's courage in the face of insurmountable odds.

Publisher: Toronto : HarperCollins, c2007
ISBN: 9780002008341
Branch Call Number: FAQIR
Characteristics: 282 p

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GLNovak
Jul 29, 2017

Salma does the unthinkable in the little town of Hima in the Levant. She falls in love and becomes pregnant. Of course her lover does not marry her and she is shunned by all in her Muslim community. To save her from being murdered by her brother, she is sent to a jail for unwed mothers, female adulterers and prostitutes where she gives birth to her daughter, who is whisked away from her without so much as a peek at the toes and fingers. Smuggled out of the prison and in to England she makes a new life for herself but yearns for Layla, her daughter. The story is very disjointed laced with no warning time-shiftings that can be disconcerting for those who prefer a linear approach, or at least clear indications of when one is reading about. I didn't come to like her enough to have her over for tea, but she worked hard and showed great humanity in her relationship with her landlady, who herself had unrequited love issues. For that I did admire Salma a lot. I kept hoping for some happiness but throughout she lived on the edge of life, and I knew we were in for something bad.

e
Eil_1
Nov 17, 2014

I've read many books about Muslim women. However, this was the most depressing of all. Misery and despair fill the pages - with a tragic ending. The not-surprising plot of this story gives evidence of the incredible violence, cruelty and barbaric behavior of many people (mainly men), who adhere to this 'religion'.

r
ruxandra_dunn
Mar 25, 2010

One of the best books I have ever read! Highly recommend!!!

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