The Prince

The Prince

Book - 2005
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'A prince must not have any other object nor any other thought...but war, its institutions, and its discipline; because that is the only art befitting one who commands.'When Machiavelli's brief treatise on Renaissance statecraft and princely power was posthumously published in 1532, it generated a debate that has raged unabated until the present day. Based upon Machiavelli's first-hand experience as an emissary of the Florentine Republic to the courts of Europe,The Prince analyses the usually violent means by which men seize, retain, and lose political power. Machiavelli added a dimension of incisive realism to one of the major philosophical and political issues of his time, especially the relationship between public deeds and private morality. His bookprovides a remarkably uncompromising picture of the true nature of power, no matter in what era or by whom it is exercised.This fluent new translation is accompanied by comprehensive notes and an introduction that considers the true purpose of The Prince and dispels some of the myths associated with it.
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2005
ISBN: 9780192804266
019280426X
Branch Call Number: 320.1 MAC
Characteristics: 133 p. ; 20 cm
Additional Contributors: Bondanella, Peter

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t
trcookIIImddmd
Sep 23, 2017

This little book is basically boring; it is touted as an instruction manual lfor gaining and maintaining power--the tenets might have worked in the days when Italian men wore pantaloons and codpieces(I imagine they still do--they carry purses and are generally pretty limp-wristed) and big frilly lace collars. George Washington is a much better example of how to maintain; and give up power.

n
Nymeria23
Jan 26, 2017

Very interesting read on how best to rule a principality in a multitude of circumstances and pertaining to many difficulties and questions a person might have so as to help a ruler understand what the best course of action may be in their case by looking towards the past.
Most of book has knowledge that I personally will likely never use in my life, but it was more captivating than I thought it would be. I liked the second half of the book more than the first, where Machiavelli explains how a Prince should act and such- I could relate to it more than the parts describing the best military to have and such.
Good book, especially if you're into (Renaissance Age) politics.
Oh! Apparently if you have to choose between being feared and loved, also choose fear, but if you have the opportunity to achieve the status of both, seize it.
And above all, it doesn't matter if you are feared or loved, so long as you are not hated.
Very interesting indeed

s
samuelrausch
Jul 21, 2016

The Prince is one of my favorite books of all. Having been in a leadership role before, I found this book to be a veritable manual for quality leadership and of human nature. While Machiavelli's applications of the leadership he expounds upon are clearly corrupt and tyrannous, when the reader looks not at his applications, but at his principles, great truths appear. Yes, what the reader sees in the book are the ultimate extremes of strong leadership, without the guidance of virtue, love, or grace. But in between these corrupt, power-hungry extensions, of Machiavelli's own addition, I found myself constantly underlining quotes of great value, and not tasting of corruption at all. There, qualities such as industriousness, avoidance of hatred, active and constant search for truth, and consistency of character.

d
DSaje
Feb 26, 2016

A great translation. After reading this- I can see how people try and shoehorn Machiavelli's template for ruling as Prince into ruling a business. After reading this - I can also see how misguided that shoehorning is. A fascinating take on how to get and maintain power, I'm interested in reading his Discourses to see his take on republic rule instead of monarch

m
Mkadatz
Apr 04, 2015

Returned on the 24th

7Liberty7 Nov 14, 2014

Machiavelli's "The Prince" can be summed up in a few words: "The 16th Century Manuel to Get and Preserve Personal Power."

a
AlanaS
Oct 09, 2009

After reading the book that I had heard so much about, it was nothing like people had described to me. Makes me wonder if they've actually read it.

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7Liberty7 Nov 14, 2014

7Liberty7 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

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